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Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology (REEP)

Integrating Diversity with Quantitative, Qualitative and Mixed Methods

The fourth edition of the English-based textbook is currently available for purchase through Sage Publications.

The ASL Companion Volume for REEP textbook is developed electronically using multimedia video format to provide ASL speakers access to the content in ASL. The full videobook and video chapters are posted here for the public to enjoy at no charge. All summaries for each chapter here were paraphrased from Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology (2015) textbook end-of-chapter summaries.

Please adhere to the copyright and intellectual property codes set by the United States government under the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976. ASLChoice retains all copyright and ownership rights for the full REEP ASL Companion Volume. Do not record, download or retain your own copy of the the videos. People who do not adhere to this law will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

ASLChoice asks you to respect the hard work of our volunteer deaf chapter author signers, filmmakers, editors, web designer, copyright and ISBN manager and more, by coming here to visit, watch, discuss and appreciate the content here as often as you want. There are APA references below for the videobook and for each chapter that you can cite and reference when appropriate. Your respect and support for our work are deeply appreciated.

Disclaimer with compassion: We are a group of all-deaf volunteers who worked hard on the English-to-ASL translation from Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology textbook, and integrating examples from the ASL and Deaf community in our signed chapters. While we currently do not have image descriptions and ASL-to-English transcript/captions for all of our videos, we also understand the importance of having the videos accessible to all members of our community. The English-print published textbook, Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology (2015) is our current, recommended alternative for members of our community who may not be able to access our signed chapters.

To cite the textbook:
Mertens, D. M. (2015). Research and evaluation in education and psychology: Integrating diversity with quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

To cite the videobook:
Harris, R. & Williams, F. (2015). Research and evaluation in education and psychology, ASL version. Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Introducing the ASL Volume for Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology Textbook

Co-Editors Raychelle Harris and Felicia Williams introduce themselves and the unique videobook concept. Then they share gratitude with the chapter authors, the original author, the publisher and people who helped make this happen.

To cite: Harris, R. & Williams, F. (2015). Introduction. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (3:26 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Foreword: Original Author of REEP – Dr. Donna M. Mertens

Dr. Donna M. Mertens was chosen as one of two foreword authors for the REEP ASL Companion Volume for many reasons. She was and continues to be a pioneer and staunch activist in equalizing the playing field in research, especially for marginalized communities, and for the Deaf communities of the world. A Gallaudet University Distinguished Faculty, Dr. Mertens is also the original author of REEP, giving us blessings to translate her revolutionary work into ASL. We are deeply honored to have Dr. Donna M. Mertens christen the launch of the ASL Companion Volume for the Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology videobook.

To cite: Mertens, D. M. & Harris, R. L. (2015). Foreword: Original author of REEP – Dr. Donna M. Mertens. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (9:15 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Click here to download the image/text descriptions and transcript.

Foreword: Parent of Academic ASL – Dr. MJ Bienvenu

Dr. MJ Bienvenu was chosen as one of two foreword authors for the REEP ASL Companion Volume for many reasons, too. She was and continues to be a pioneer and staunch activist for the equalizing of ASL with English, especially in academics and in research. She continues to be the only one in the world to have published several chapters of her dissertation solely in ASL. We are equally as deeply honored to have Dr. MJ Bienvenu christen the launch of the ASL Companion Volume for the Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology videobook.

Click here to download the image/text descriptions and transcript.

Prologue: What is Research?

In this introductory chapter originally created by Raychelle (which is not derived from the REEP textbook) , Raychelle introduces several basic concepts in research in her narrative about a shopping trip to the local shopping mall. The following chapters are actual translations weaved with ASL/Deaf community examples of chapters in Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology authored by Gallaudet faculty, Dr. Donna M. Mertens.

To cite: Harris, R. (2015). What is research? In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (11:34 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available; please contact us to volunteer services.

Chapter 1: An Introduction to Research

The importance of the philosophy of science for the conduct of research is discussed in this chapter. The philosophical framework for the four major paradigms that influence researchers and evaluators and underlie their research decisions and actions are described. An inadequate but essentialist description of the four paradigms is as follows: Postpositivism emphasizes objectivity, experimentation, and generalizability. Constructivism emphasizes constructed realities, interaction with participants, and rich description. Transformative researchers focus on issues of social justice, human rights, and cultural complexity. Pragmatic researchers match the research questions with the choice of research methods.

To cite: Harris, R. (2015). An introduction to research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (23:28 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 2: Evaluation

Evaluation and research share many things; however, the differences between the two genres of systematic inquiry involve jargon and specific terms, what is being evaluated, and stakeholders. Evaluation has a history of development from the early 1960s to the present; it is a dynamic new field with new developments occurring in response to challenges and political factors. The four major paradigms can also be used to frame evaluation studies.

To cite: Williams, F. & Harris, R. (2016). Evaluation. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (15:05 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 3: Literature Review and Focusing the Research

A review of scholarly literature provides information that can be used to investigate a topic of importance to learn what is known about that topic for its own sake (i.e., to improve teaching or therapy) or as a basis for designing a research study. Multiple sources exist for the conduct of literature review, including primary and secondary sources. A literature review is used to develop research questions.

To cite: Oates, J. A. & Harris, R. L. (2015). Literature review and focusing the research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (12:49 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 4: Experimental & Quasi-Experimental Research

Experimental and quasi-experimental designs are the hallmark methodologies of the postpositivist paradigm. These designs are intended to determine if an independent variable caused a change in a dependent variable by controlling the effects of extraneous variables as much as possible. The experimental designs require random assignment of participants to conditions, a demand that is not always possible in educational and psychological research. Hence, the quasi-experimental designs maintain much of the rigor of the experimental designs but allow for the use of intact groups in conditions.

To cite: Stone, A. & Williams, F. (2015). Experimental and quasi-experimental research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (26:23 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 5: Casual Comparative and Correlational Approaches

Causal comparative and correlational research both focus on the study of inherent or nonmanipulable variables. Causal comparative research compares groups on various characteristics such as sex and race. Correlational research looks at the strengths and direction of relationship between or among variables. In both of these research approaches, the researcher needs to avoid making causal inferences between the predictor variables and the criterion variable.

To cite: Wilkins, E., Harris, R. & Williams, F. (2016). Causal comparative and correlational research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (14:09 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 6: Survey Methods

Surveys are commonly used in educational and psychological research. The quality of a survey is tied to the effort put into design, including specification of purpose and mode of data collection. Pilot testing a survey is a critical part of ensuring quality that researchers can use to determine the quality of the questions as well as the need for modifications in the implementation of the survey. Two other critical criteria for quality in survey research include the response rate and follow-up of nonrespondents.

To cite: Harris, R. L. & Velasquez, J. O. (2015). Survey methods. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (25:53 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 7: Single-Case Research

Single-case research is designed to determine the conditions necessary to change an identified behavior of a single person (or a small number of people). This research requires that the targeted behavior be quantifiable and countable in a reliable manner. The designs for single-case research all begin with a baseline measure to determine the frequency of the behavior before intervention. Analysis of single-case research is typically done with graphing the frequency of behaviors; descriptive statistics can also be used when appropriate.

To cite: Harris, R. & Hottle, K. (2015). Single-case research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (9:26 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 8: Qualitative Research

Researchers from different paradigmatic perspectives choose to use qualitative methods for different reasons. Constructivists use qualitative methods in order to explore the social construction of reality or document causal relationships. Transformative researchers use qualitative methods to capture the lived experiences of those who are marginalized or the systemic oppression dynamics in society. Pragmatists use qualitative methods if they think that their research question justifies the use of such methods. Overall, qualitative methods allow a researcher to get a richer and a more complex picture of the phenomenon under study than do quantitative methods.

To cite: Marchut, A., Williams, F. & Harris, R. (2016). Qualitative methods. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (39:30 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 9: Historical and Narrative Study of Lives

Historical and narrative research can be based on a topic of study (e.g., educational experiences of deaf African American students during the Civil Rights era), life stories of individuals (biographies) or life stories of the researcher (autobiography), and autoethnography, which shifts the focus between the individual telling the story and multiple social and cultural layers. Historical research focuses on the past; narrative research focuses on the present. Historical and narrative research has an important role in making visible the context that surrounds present challenges that are encountered in education and psychology.

To cite: Moore, J. & Harris, R. (2015). History and narrative study of lives. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (12:40 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 10: Mixed Methods Research

In some ways, mixed methods is not a new way of doing research, as many researchers have engaged in the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data. However, the research community now reflects an increased interest in mixed methods and how to explore more systematically the advantages and disadvantages of their use. Designs for mixed methods include consideration of the temporal relation between the use of each type of method (quantitative and qualitative) and the philosophical belief systems that underlie the research decisions.

To cite: Kartheiser, G. & Williams, F. (2015). Mixed methods research. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (9:07 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 11: Sampling

Different paradigmatic stances are used to raise questions about appropriate sampling strategies. All researchers share concerns about ethics and have ethical review boards, professional codes of ethics, and cultural awareness to guide them in proper sampling procedures.

To cite: Singleton, D., Gunderson, J. & Harris, R. (2015). Sampling. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (20:59 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 12: Data Collection

Data collection is a complex and important part of the research process. Criteria for data collection quality differ depending on the paradigm from which the research is conducted. Once the data are collected, the researcher is ready to move on to data analysis, the subject of the next chapter.

To cite: Davis, J., Harris, R. & Williams, F. (2016). Data collection. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (14:24 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.

Chapter 13: Data Analysis, Interpretation and Use

Data analysis strategies for quantitative data are generally statistical in nature, and the choice of the appropriate statistic is based on the purpose of the research, the design of the study, and the characteristics of the data themselves. Qualitative data generally consist of words but can also include visual items such as artifacts, video, and pictures. Interpretation of both types of data requires sensitivity to cultural issues.

To cite: Griffin, F. & Harris, R. (2015). Data analysis, interpretation and use. In R. Harris & F. Williams (Eds.), Research and Evaluation in Education and Psychology, ASL Version (27:50 m.). Austin, TX: ASLChoice.

Image/text description and transcript link currently not available. For access to English text, please access the original chapter here.